Housing Production and Housing Price Relationship in Turkey

This paper is to elaborate on the paradoxical situation Turkey is facing: while building construction cost has risen by 22.8 per cent in nominal, 9.8 per cent in real prices, real housing prices have decreased by up to 7 percent.

Written by Prof. Dr. Ali Türel, Çankaya University, Department of City and Regional Planning, Ankara, Turkey

Residential project EX-115 (Golden Horn Sea View Apartments) under construction in Eyüp, Istanbul, Turkey. Source: http://www.extraproperty.com

In terms of total floor area, Turkey is the leading producer of housing in Europe. Annual starts are around 1 million dwelling units with about 150 million m2 of total gross floor areas, and completions are 750 thousand on average having between 110-120 million m2 of gross floor area. The number of newly formed households in recent years has been between 500 and 550 thousand, and when renewal of risky housing against natural disasters is added, annual housing need can be estimated as 650 to 700 thousand dwelling units. Housing starts between 2010 and 2016 were about twice, and housing completions about 50 per cent greater than the number of newly formed households. Syrian refugees may also have created additional housing demand, by as much as 500 thousand dwelling units since the beginning of the war in Syria.

High levels of housing production occur without much state intervention to the housing market, as most of the conventional housing policies of the welfare state have not been introduced in Turkey. The supply side is favoured more than demand side in state policies, as evidenced by incentives recently provided to builders. Some additional construction rights beyond that determined by Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for each parcel were granted to builders by a By-law in 2013. Such additions, most of which can be made at the basement of buildings, were limited by 30 per cent of FAR in 2017 due to reactions of professional organizations. Another incentive of the 2013 By-law is reducing rear garden distance that enables builders to produce housing on parcels that had insufficient depth according to the former By-law. Otherwise, housing markets operate under a highly competitive environment without much state intervention. Primary support to moderate-to-lower income people in housing acquisition is producing housing on publicly owned land by the Housing Development Administration (HDA), a Department attached to the Prime Ministry selling at affordable conditions. Continue reading Housing Production and Housing Price Relationship in Turkey

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GDP revision in Turkey: implications on construction market size

TUIK (Turkish Statistical Institute) had been working on harmonizing its GDP calculation method with the most recent international standards from 2013 on. The first revised figures were published at the end of 2016. After the revision, the construction market size was measured twice as large for 2015 as it was considered earlier.

This presentation is about the revised construction size and EECFA’s opinion: Turkey’s GDP and Construction Investment

Prepared by Janos Gaspar (EECFA Research)

 

 

EECFA 2017 Summer Construction Forecast and Revision

We have released our summer construction forecast on 16 June 2017 on Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Turkey and Ukraine. This post intends to summarize the most important projections for these construction markets for the years 2017-2019. These are our main findings; for a deeper understanding, please consult our reports. You can contact us on eecfa.com.

Outlook for the EECFA regions

The highly optimistic outlook for South East Europe is maintained by EECFA. Leaving behind the transitory 2016, when the absorption of funds available in the new EU programming period (2014-2020) was still at a low level, the upcoming years are characterized by a bigger expansion of the construction market than that of GDP. Building construction is predicted to well outperform the total market, with a yearly average rate of 9% over the horizon. The small growth in the region’s total civil engineering market is attributed to the negative expectations in Romania.

Sideway moves, no further market expansion on the horizon are what we consider the most probable scenario for the 3 East European markets together. Turkey and Russia, being far the two biggest markets we cover in EECFA, is expected to show some similarities. In both countries our forecasts are moderately optimistic in the civil engineering market. While in the building construction market the outlook is clearly negative for Russia and neutral for Turkey. In Ukraine, the recovery experienced in 2016 is predicted to be sustained until 2019. Both building construction and civil engineering could expand further with a relatively good pace. Continue reading EECFA 2017 Summer Construction Forecast and Revision